Platform for African – European Partnership in Agricultural Research for Development

Tuesday, September 22, 2020

REPORT: Comparative study on the distribution of value in European chocolate chains

FAO and BASIC. 2020. Comparative study on the distribution of value in European chocolate chains. Paris. DOI link. 234 pages

This study by the Food and Agriculture Organization and the Bureau d’analyse sociétale pour une

information citoyenne (BASIC) explores the distribution of value and costs along cocoa and chocolate supply chains. With a focus on the French market of dark and milk chocolate, confectionery bars and breakfast cocoa powder, it analyses cocoa grown in four producer countries: Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Ecuador and Cameroon.

Principally the report aims to estimate the distribution of value, costs and profits for different chocolate products from cocoa farmers to consumers and explore the influencing factors. It also compares the value accrued by farmers for the different products. Its main findings are that 70% of the total value are accrued by brands and retailers, the final two actors in the chain. At the opposite end of the chain, 18.6% of total value is accrued in cocoa producing countries.
  • This study investigates the French market of dark and milk chocolate tablets, as well as confectionery bars and breakfast cocoa powder sold in supermarket stores - made of cocoa beans grown in Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Ecuador, and Cameroon to provide better insight into the aggregate on value creation and cost along the various stages of the cocoa and chocolate chain. 
  • It shows that differentiation in value creation and cost takes place mainly in the two last stages of the chain. Main factors linked to downstream differentiation are product brand and reputation, and market segmentation, as well as other less tangible consumer product attributes. On the other hand, the research indicates that the value and costs associated with the stages from cocoa cultivation to chocolate couverture manufacturing are much more stable. 
  • This study will be a key element of the EU dialogue for sustainable cocoa and of the policy dialogues at country level. It will allow to simulate various levels of prices and premiums (notably Living Income Differential) and to assess their impacts on the various segments of the chain in terms of margin, costs, value added creation and impact on final price to consumers.
Resources:
Related:
22 September 2020. WEBINAR. EU MULTI-STAKEHOLDER DIALOGUE FOR SUSTAINABLE COCOA.
In the context of the European Commission’s political priorities including the European Green Deal and a zero tolerance approach on child labour, the Commission will initiate an informal dialogue in support of a sustainable cocoa sector.

It will build upon the initiative of the two main producing countries, Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana, existing initiatives of EU Member States, third countries, and international organisations. Considering the role of the EU as policy and global standard setter, the objective of the dialogue is to support the elimination of child labour and child trafficking, the protection and restorations of forests, and to ensure a living income for cocoa farmers.

Related:
30 June 2020. A webinar was hosted on 30th of June by the Vice-President of the European Parliament, Ms. Heidi Hautala, and the welcoming remarks were made by Ms. Carla Montesi, Director at DG DEVCO, Mr. Mohamed Manssouri, Director at FAO Investment Centre and Mr. Harold Poelma, ECA Chairman.

The event was attended by 200 participants

It welcomed the following speakers: H.E. Abou Dosso, Ambassador of Ivory Coast to Belgium, H.E. Sena Siaw-Boateng, Ambassador of Ghana to Belgium, H.E. Pablo Ortiz García, Ambassador of Ecuador to Belgium, Mr. Antonie Fountain, Managing Director of VOICE Network, Ms. Awa Traoré Bamba, Managing Director of Cooperative CAYAT, and Mr. Aldo Cristiano, Chairman of CAOBISCO.

Related:
Deux grandes familles rivales du cacao, les Desva et les Ahitey, se livrent une bataille sans merci pour le contrôle de la production et du négoce cacaoyer de la région de Caodji. À leur tête, deux chefs de clan sans scrupules : l’influent et riche Élie Desva, issu de l’aristocratie ivoirienne du cacao, et le brut et excessif self-made man Jean Ahitey. Un affrontement impitoyable qui dévoile les rouages du monde méconnu du cacao en Afrique de l'Ouest.

Book Launch | Ethiopia’s agri-food system: Past trends, present challenges, and future scenarios

22 September 2020.
Virtual Book Launch, Ethiopia’s agri-food system: Past trends, present challenges, and future scenarios

Ethiopia has experienced impressive agricultural growth and poverty reduction, stemming in part from substantial public investments in agriculture. Yet, the agriculture sector now faces increasing land and water constraints along with other challenges to growth. Growth in the agriculture sector remains essential to continued poverty reduction in Ethiopia and will depend on sustained investment in the agrifood system, especially private sector investment.

This book presents a forward-looking analysis of Ethiopia’s agrifood system in the context of a rapidly changing economy. Many of the policies for a successful agricultural and rural development strategy for Ethiopia are relevant for other African countries and how this book can serve as a valuable resource for policymakers, development specialists, and others concerned with economic development in Africa south of the Sahara.


Book Presentation

Panel Discussion
  • Lulit Mitik Beyene, CEO, Ethiopian Economics Association
  • Dominique Davoux, Head of Rural Development, Green Sector and Food Security, European Union Delegation
  • John F. Hoddinott, H.E. Babcock Professor of Food & Nutrition Economics and Policy Division of Nutritional Sciences, NS CALS, Cornell Institute for Public Affairs
  • Nemera Gebeyehu Mamo, Deputy Commissioner, Planning and Development Commission, Ethiopia

European Research and Innovation Days: POST-COVID FOOD SYSTEM ECONOMY

22-24 September 2020
. European Research and Innovation Days

European Research and Innovation Days is the European Commission’s annual flagship Research and Innovation event, bringing together policymakers, researchers, entrepreneurs and the public to debate and shape the future of research and innovation in Europe and beyond. This year, it is a fully virtual event, with the Policy conference and the Science is Wonderful! online exhibition.

By creating connections between cutting-edge scientific research and the most pressing challenges of a generation, the European Research and Innovation Days represent a unique opportunity to join the conversation and enact real change. From tackling the climate crisis to building a digital world that works for everyone, we’ll delve into the questions that shape who we are and the future we want to live in: it’s time to get involved!

The event is all about collaboration: bringing together individuals and experts from all areas to build connections and ignite a brighter future.

Extracts of the programme

22/09 @ 10:30 European Green Deal and Just Transition
This plenary session took an in-depth look at the research and innovation contribution to the European Green Deal and the recovery. It will be future-oriented and take into account the youth perspective with a special focus on climate, ocean and biodiversity.
  • EVP Frans Timmermans 
  • Mariya Gabriel 
  • Eimear Manning 
  • Johan Rockström 
  • Yousef Yousef 
  • Jean-Eric Paquet

22/09 @ 12:45 UNCROSSING PLANETARY BOUNDARIES: How to get nutrient flows back within safe ecological limits?
Experts from different fields linked to nutrients will discuss the environmental impacts of excessive nutrient flows and the possible solutions and barriers for bringing the nitrogen and phosphorus cycles within safe regional and planetary boundaries.

Speakers : John Bell, Mark A. Sutton, Chiara Manoli, Jannes Maes, Annika Eskusson

22/09 @ 12:45 Building a POST-COVID FOOD SYSTEM ECONOMY that works for people, planet and climate
Food must be treated less as a commodity and more as a common good. This session will explore alternative models for a new multi-objective food systems economy that can meet the EU Green Deal and Farm to Fork Strategy objectives.

Speakers : John Bell, Johan Swinnen, Silke Thiele, Ana Moragues

23/09 @ 10:30 The opportunity to halt BIODIVERSITY loss
The session will show how Horizon Europe will support the European Green Deal through science, research & innovation. It will improve our understanding of biodiversity decline and drive action for biodiversity & ecosystems protection & restoration, by promoting nature-based solutions & sustainable management of natural capital.
The call includes opportunities for international cooperation in addressing the needs of less-developed nations, particularly in Africa,

Saturday, September 19, 2020

Overview of latest reports

Food Security / Food systems

REPORT: Estimating the cost of SDG 2: Zero hunger

  • The Making of a Model: integrating environmental sustainability and farmer incomes to measure the cost of ending hunger
  • This research project wants to answer two linked questions: (i) What will it cost governments to end hunger as defined by Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2? (ii) And what are the most effective public investments to end hunger sustainably based on the available evidence?
  •  13 October 2020. Online dialogue. A WORLD WITHOUT HUNGER IS POSSIBLE – WHAT MUST BE DONE. Dr. Gerd Müller, Federal Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development, will use this online event for a discussion with German and international guests on the latest scientific studies, and on practical ways of fighting hunger and poverty.

REPORT: Bridging demand and supply of private investment capital for small and medium agribusinesses

  • T.S. Jayne, Richard Ferguson, Sloans Chimatiro, September 2020 ©FCDO, 56 pages
  • The study assesses whether what is needed is different forms of capital; greater work to provide the pre-conditions for private investment in agri-food systems; or both of these. The resulting analysis addresses the needs and interests of both investors and investment-support stakeholders.
  • African food staple value chains are important long-term endeavours that will still require grant financing, blended finance, technical support, and de-risking guarantees if they are to be considered fertile ground for impact investors.
  • Panel discussion: 15/09 AGRF. Including Thom Jayne is University Foundation Professor of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics at Michigan State University. In 2019, Jayne is seconded to the African Development Bank, serving as Special Advisor to the President. 

REPORT: Effectiveness of agri-business incubation in emerging markets.

  • Alberto Didoni, Varcando Ltd., 2020©FCDO. 33 pages
  • Recommendation: Donors should keep financing high-risk incubation work
  • Panel discussion: 15/09 AGRF

REPORT: ICTs for improving investment readiness of small and medium agribusinesses

  • Alvaro Valverde, September 2020 ©FCDO, 75 pages
  • Panel discussion: 15/09 AGRF

REPORT: Special Report EU development aid to Kenya

  • European Court of Auditors., 73 pages
  • Limited Impacts of EU Aid: Between 2014-2020, Kenya received $515 million from the European Union for developments in food security, sustainable agriculture, and accountability of public institutions.
  • To increase impacts of development spending, the report recommends that aid focus on fewer areas, with an emphasis on manufacturing to increase job creation.
  • 16/09 Audit finds EU aid to Kenya lacked impact : “In agriculture in the longer term or middle term there will be less jobs. At the same time, there are a lot of opportunities to create more value on this production chain in Kenya and that would be easily part of the manufacturing activity and creating jobs, doing something with these agricultural products.” ; “Job creation in particular, will feature prominently in the negotiations with Kenya on the next country program. It is already the focus of successful ongoing initiatives which support agriculture in the country.”

BOOK: Agricultural extension: global status and performance in selected countries

  • September 2020, 380 pages
  • This book provides a global overview of agricultural extension and advisory services, assesses and compares extension systems at the national and regional levels, examines the performance of extension approaches in a selected set of country cases (Brazil, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Malawi, and Uganda), and shares lessons and policy insights.
  • 10 September 2020. BOOK LAUNCH Virtual Event - Co-Organized by IFPRI and the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM).

REPORT: Africa Agriculture Status Report. Feeding Africa’s Cities: Opportunities, Challenges, and Policies for Linking African Farmers with Growing Urban Food Markets.

REPORT: The food systems approach in practice. ECDPM guide for sustainable transformation.

  • ECDPM paper, July 2020, 20 pages
  • Tackling the myriad sustainability challenges related to food – from the environmental impacts of food production to the health consequences of inadequate diets – requires systemic interventions that improve sustainability at local, national, and international level.

REPORT: Pan-African Private Sector Trade and Investment Committee (PAFTRAC) survey

  • This survey highlighted the private sector’s desire for considerable reforms to make the global trade rules system fairer and more transparent.
  • The analysis, done ahead of the selection of the new WTO director general, surveyed a total of 200 African CEOs around issues concerning the WTO and trade in general.
  • It covered a number of areas which revealed a general consensus that the current rules penalise the African continent and its private sector.

COVID-19

REPORT: Food Crises and COVID‑19:Emerging evidence and implications. An analysis of acute food insecurity and agri‑food systemsduring COVID‑19 pandemic. 

  • Technical note. 38 pages
  • Global Network Against Food Crises is re-orienting its key priorities within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, with emphasis on enhancing the generation and sharing of evidence-based information and analysis on food crises and COVID-19 effects.
  • 15/09 European Commissioner Janez Lenarcic opened the UNGA side event

REPORT: Survey on bilateral actors’ emerging priorities, short- and long-term financing and programming implications in light of COVID-19.

  • developed by OECD, 34 pages

REPORT: Facilitating cross-border trade through a coordinated African response to COVID-19,

  • The Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) has launched a new COVID-19 cross-border trade report , 48 pages
  • It urges governments on the continent to adopt and harmonize policies that will help continent strike an appropriate balance between curbing the spread of the virus and facilitating emergency and essential trade.

Green Deal

REPORT: The WWF 2020 Living Planet Report
  • released 10/09, published by WWF every two years, documents trends in biodiversity and the health of our planet, 83 pages
  • “The recently proposed EU Biodiversity and Farm to Fork strategies are potential game changers and must now be unequivocally endorsed and implemented by Member States and Parliament. But that is not enough. We must also curb the EU’s global footprint, which is driving the destruction of forests, grasslands and other precious ecosystems outside of Europe. A strong new law to keep products linked to deforestation out of the EU market is urgently needed!”

REPORT: Global Biodiversity Outlook 5.

  • Montreal. Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (2020) 212 pages.
  • The Global Biodiversity Outlook (GBO) is the flagship publication of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). It is a periodic report that summarizes the latest data on the status and trends of biodiversity and draws conclusions relevant to the further implementation of the Convention.

ARTICLE: The 10 Elements of Agroecology

  • New FAO peer-reviewed publication, 19 pages
  • FAO) has approved the 10 Elements of Agroecology as an analytical framework to support the design of differentiated paths for agriculture and food systems transformation, hence facilitating improved decision-making by policymakers, practitioners and other stakeholders in differing contexts at a range of levels on a number of scales.

REPORT: 
 Collaborating for adaptation : findings and outcomes of a research initiative across Africa and Asia

BOOK: The Nature of Nature: Why We Need the Wild.

  • Enric Sala wants to change the world--and in this compelling book, he shows us how. Once we appreciate how nature works, he asserts, we will understand why conservation is economically wise and essential to our survival.

Friday, September 18, 2020

REPORT: The Global Biodiversity Outlook (GBO)

Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (2020) Global Biodiversity Outlook 5. Montreal. 212 pages.

15 September 2020. The Global Biodiversity Outlook (GBO) is the flagship publication of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). It is a periodic report that summarizes the latest data on the status and trends of biodiversity and draws conclusions relevant to the further implementation of the Convention.

GBO-5 provides global summary of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets and is based on a range of indicators, research studies and assessments (in particular the IPBES Global Assessment on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services), as well as the national reports provided by countries on their implementation of the CBD. 

The national reports provide rich information about the steps taken in countries worldwide in support of biodiversity conservation, sustainable use, and the fair and equitable sharing of benefits. This body of Information provides a wealth of information on the successes and challenges in implementing the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 and in reaching the Aichi Biodiversity Targets.

This Outlook draws on the lessons learned during the first two decades of this century to clarify the transitions needed if we are to realize the vision agreed by world governments for 2050, ‘Living in Harmony with Nature’.

Extract: SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE, AQUACULTURE AND FORESTRY
There has been a substantial expansion of efforts to promote sustainable agriculture, forestry and aquaculture over recent years, including through farmer-led agroecological approaches. The use of fertilizers and pesticides has stabilized globally, though at high levels. Despite such progress, biodiversity continues to decline in landscapes used to produce food and timber; and food and agricultural production remains among the main drivers of global biodiversity loss. The target has not been achieved (high confidence).(page 66). 

REPORT: Estimating the cost of SDG 2: Zero hunger


Ceres 2030 is a partnership between Cornell IP-CALS, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), and the International Institute of Sustainable Development (IISD).  Ceres2030 is a three-year project that will conclude early in 2021. Funding support comes from Germany’s Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF).

This research project wants to answer two linked questions: 
  1. What will it cost governments to end hunger as defined by Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2? 
  2. And what are the most effective public investments to end hunger sustainably based on the available evidence? 
An important early milestone in the Ceres2030 project has involved preparing the economic cost model so that it can factor in different kinds of public policy interventions, which first requires defining them in a way that functions appropriately for the model; integrating key data related to the achievement of SDG targets 2.3 and 2.4 on agricultural productivity and environmental sustainability; and incorporating sample country data that will allow for making the necessary projections of the cost of ending hunger.

The current versions of chapters 1, 3, and 5 are now available in the below table of contents. Ceres2030 will soon publish the remaining chapters, as well as a full-length version of the entire publication.

Executive Summary (forthcoming)
Chapter 1: Defining Public Policy Interventions
Chapter 2: The Baselines for the Model (forthcoming)
Chapter 3: Selection of Sample Countries for the Model
Chapter 4: How We Plan to Increase Incomes and Productivity for Small-Scale Producers (forthcoming)
Chapter 5: How We Plan to Integrate Environmental Sustainability
Chapter 6: The Scenarios for the Model
Conclusions (forthcoming)

Related:

13 October 2020. Online dialogue. A WORLD WITHOUT HUNGER IS POSSIBLE – WHAT MUST BE DONE

Dr. Gerd Müller, Federal Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development, wants to use the online event "A WORLD WITHOUT HUNGER IS POSSIBLE" for a discussion with German and international guests on the latest scientific studies, and on practical ways of fighting hunger and poverty.

REPORT: Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia (CARIAA)

International Development Research Centre. 2020.  Ottawa, Canada. 46 pages 

A new report presents findings in the five key areas where the Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia (CARIAA) contributed new knowledge and evidence.

The key areas are identifying the hotspot effects of 1.5°C global warming; strengthening adaptation; addressing gender and social inequality through inclusive adaptation; understanding migration in the context of adaptation; and strengthening resilience through private sector adaptation. 

The report elaborates on each key area and provides links to related information. Its conclusions also outline implications for the climate change research community at large.

Using an innovative three-step methodology called Value Chain Analysis for Resilience in Drylands (VCARID), CARIAA research aimed to identify climate risk, adaptation options, and opportunities for private sector development in key economic sectors in five countries . Based on inputs from national stakeholders, analysis focused on the value chains related to cotton in Burkina Faso and Pakistan, and livestock in Kenya, Senegal, and Tajikistan.

Research on the beef sector in Kenya, which highlighted climate risks to livestock production (Abuya, 2019), had a significant influence on policymaking at the county and national levels (Said et al., 2018). At a local level, this included reinforcing the sustainability of wildlife and livestock grazing lands by integrating land use planning, drought mitigation, and land tenure reforms within county development plans in Kajiado, Laikipia, Makueni, and Narok. 

CARIAA research on the climate impacts of selected value chains in semi-arid countries suggests that:
  • With the right support, climate-sensitive sectors can continue to play a vital economic role. 
  • Actors in the formal private sector see few incentives to adapt, leaving producers to bear most of the climate risk. 
  • Regulation and public investment are needed to incentivize sustainable forms of private sector adaptation. 
  • Providing early warning and other climate information services, financial services, and targeted investments could significantly increase adaptive capacity. 

Background:

Between 2012 and 2019, IDRC and the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development funded CARIAA to help build resilience for people who live in high-risk climate hotspots across Africa and Asia. Under a collaborative consortia model, CARIAA sought to inform climate change adaptation policy and practice through concerted research efforts.

Read Collaborating for Adaptation: Findings and Outcomes of a Research Initiative Across Africa and Asia http://hdl.handle.net/10625/58971

REPORT: Effectiveness of agri-business incubation in emerging markets

7 September 2020The Commercial Agriculture for Smallholders and Agribusiness (CASA) Programme held its first Global Agribusiness Investor Summit at this year’s African Green Revolution Forum (AGRF) Virtual Summit. (See: panel discussion 07/09 Effectiveness of Agri-Business Incubation in Emerging Markets).

The CASA programme is implemented by NIRAS ; Swisscontact ; CABI ; TechnoServe ; iied ; Malabo Montpellier and funded by DfID (now replaced by Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO).

At that occasion, three of CASA’s ground-breaking research reports were released:

Effectiveness of agri-business incubation in emerging markets.

Alberto Didoni, Varcando Ltd., 2020©FCDO. 33 pages 

Agri-business incubators play an important role in developing technology and value chains that let small agricultural businesses thrive in developing countries and emerging markets. However, scant evidence has been collected on the effectiveness of such interventions at generating additional investments in the sector. This paper remedies this. 

The research aimed to: 
  1. identify examples of incubators of small and medium enterprises (SME) that have successfully catalysed investment into the agricultural sector over the last 10 years; 
  2. identify and analyse types of agribusiness incubators; and 
  3. provide evidence on the results and impact of the different incubation models and, where applicable and information is available, on gendered impacts.
Recommendations
  1. Donors should keep financing high-risk incubation work
  2. Stronger links with early-stage investors are essential 
  3. Funders should insist on better data capturing 
  4. A stronger focus is needed on value for money
  5. Reducing gender disparity via incubators is possible
  6. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic



  • Alice Chapple Alice is an economist and a specialist in impact investment and impact assessment. She is CASA’s investment Adviser - Introduction to CASA and CASA’s Investor Summit at AGRF’s Deal Room
  • Alberto Didoni, Alberto is the founder and Managing Directorof Varcando Ltd, a consulting firm that provides advisory services to companies and investors on cross-border transactions and investment projects in emerging and frontier economies. Presentation of research, main findings and recommendations
  • Srinivas Ramanujam, Srinivas is the Chief Executive Officer of Villgro, which is one of India’s pioneering incubators of social enterprises
  • Jonathan Philroy, Jonathan Philroy is a Manager with the Agribusiness & Innovation Platform (AIP) at ICRISAT, Hyderabad.
  • Louise De Klerk, Louise is the Chief Executive Officer and founder of Timbali Technology Incubator. Timbali Technology Incubator in the Mpumalanga region of South Africa seeks to help rural farmers whose livelihood has been undercut by high-volume large farms.
  • Ralph von Kaufmann. Ralph is the co-founder of Hakika Ltd and an associate consultant for African Agribusiness Incubators’ Network (AAIN). Previously, he was responsible for the coordination of the facility for the Universities, Business and Research in Agricultural Innovation (UniBRAIN) initiative which is supporting the establishment of agribusiness incubators in Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Uganda and Zambia.

ICTs for improving investment readiness of small and medium agribusinesses

Alvaro Valverde, September 2020 ©FCDO, 75 pages

This study analyses the factors behind successful deployment of mobile technologies to improve agribusiness productivity and investment readiness. It aims to analyse agricultural value-added services (agri-VAS) that have SME agribusinesses as their main clients, as they are more likely to positively impact the investment readiness of SME agribusinesses than agri-VAS with smallholder farmers as their only clients, which are also the most evaluated type of agri-VAS.

  • Alice Chapple. Alice is an economist and a specialist in impact investment and impact assessment. She is CASA’s investment Adviser - Introduction to CASA and CASA’s Investor Summit at AGRF’s Deal Room
  • Keynote by Richard Teuten, OBE - Head of the Growth and Resilience Department at the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office.
  • Alvaro Valverde, CASA - He is currently working for CABI as Private Sector Engagement Manager and as Relationship Manager for DFID’s funded Commercial Agriculture for Smallholders and Agribusiness (CASA) Programme: Presentation of research, main findings and recommendations
  • David Davies, AgUnity. AgUnity is a philanthropic venture applying block chain and smartphone technology to improve the lives of small farmer cooperatives in developing countries
  • Jan Willem van Casteren, Non Executive Director or eProd Solutions Ltd, which offers an ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) tool for supplier management for SMEs active (e.g. traders and food processors) and member-based organizations (e.g. cooperatives)
  • Prof. Muhammadou Kah, Malabo Montpelier Panel. Vice President of Academic Affairs/Provost & Professor of Information Technology & Computing at American University of Nigeria.

Bridging demand and supply of private investment capital for small and medium agribusinesses

T.S. Jayne, Richard Ferguson, Sloans Chimatiro, September 2020 ©FCDO, 56 pages

This study is motivated by an apparent contradiction: suppliers of capital report a lack of investible opportunities in Africa, while demanders of capital cannot find willing partners to provide capital to them. In spite of significant amounts of private capital being available for investment worldwide, institutional and impact investors have found it difficult to mobilise large amounts of private investment for agribusiness opportunities in Africa. 

This study identifies strategies for development and impact-investment actors to bridge the gap between the risk-reward demands (or adjusted risk-returns) of investment capital and the available supply of agri-businesses for investment. 

The study assesses whether what is needed is different forms of capital; greater work to provide the pre-conditions for private investment in agri-food systems; or both of these.The resulting analysis addresses the needs and interests of both investors and investment-support stakeholders.
Proposals and recommendations are grouped into considerations for: 
  1. African governments; 
  2. impact investors; and 
  3. development partners and donor organizations. 

    African food staple value chains are important long-term endeavours that will still require grant financing, blended finance, technical support, and de-risking guarantees if they are to be considered fertile ground for impact investors. Philanthropists and foundations are well suited to lower investment risk by providing grants to early-stage impact enterprises

    Grant-based interventions have to be designed carefully in order to avoid crowding out private sector spending or under-cutting long-term system-wide philanthropic efforts.

    Philanthropy can risk subsidizing businesses that should fail. It is thus best used on sector-level investments and not to artificially create winners. 
Panel discussion:
  • Alice Chapple Alice is an economist and a specialist in impact investment and impact assessment. She is CASA’s investment Adviser - Introduction to CASA and CASA’s Investor Summit at AGRF’s Deal Room
  • Prof. Thomas Jayne. Thom Jayne is University Foundation Professor of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics at Michigan State University. He is a Fellow of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association and a Distinguished Fellow of the African Association of Agricultural Economists. In 2017, he became the Flagship Co-Leader of the CGIAR Policies, Institutions and Markets research program on Economy-wide Factors Affecting Agricultural Growth and Rural Transformation. In 2019, Jayne is seconded to the African Development Bank, serving as Special Advisor to the President.
  • Julia Wakeling, Julia oversees the management of environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks, and the monitoring and reporting of the impact of Silverstreet Capital’s investments. SilverStreet Capital is a UK based investment advisor managing African agricultural funds.
  • Timothy Strong. Tim is the Head of Agriculture Finance at Opportunity International. Opportunity International provides microfinance loans, savings, insurance and training to over 14.3 million people who are working their way out of poverty in the developing world.

WEBINAR: COVID-19, global markets and African agricultural trade: Impacts on nutrition and economic growth

17 September 2020. The economic shocks of COVID-19 on global markets have left the African continent, along with its producers and consumers, distinctly vulnerable. This seminar examined how changes in global food trade since the pandemic have impacted African food systems, regional supply chains and food access.

Presenters discussed the potential long-term risks of trade disruptions for nutrition and economic growth, and identify recovery policies that governments can prioritize to strengthen food security, regional supply chains and livelihoods. The speakers considered the social, political and logistical barriers to trade across the continent in the face of COVID-19, the challenges of equitably distributing the benefits of trade, and trade’s role in building back better.

Opening Remarks
  • Moderator: Fousseini Traoré, Research Fellow, IFPRI
  • Samuel Benin, Deputy Division Director, Africa, IFPRI
  • Patterson Brown, Senior Trade Advisor, Bureau for Resilience and Food Security, United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
Speakers

Thursday, September 17, 2020

Lessons from COVID-19 for Building a Better Future through Sustainable Livestock


17-18 September 2020
. From Crisis to Action – Lessons from COVID-19 for Building a Better Future through Sustainable Livestock. Link for Thursday meeting + link for Friday meeting

Regional Meetings: 31 August to 15 September 2020
Global Meeting: 14 to 18 September 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic is a global issue, with crucial short and long-term consequences, and the livestock sector must play its role in contributing to more sustainable, healthy future food systems. All livestock stakeholders have a role to play in articulating COVID's impacts on the sector and ensuring sustainable livestock fully contribute to building forward on all development aspects. With a multi-stakeholder approach, the meeting will identify COVID-19's impacts and strategize stakeholder responses worldwide to build forward a more sustainable future from the livestock sector. 

Global objectives
  • Facilitate a global discussion among GASL stakeholders and the wider development community to assess the diversity of opportunities and challenges derived from the COVID-19 pandemic across different regions of the world
  • Strategize how the livestock sector can respond towards more sustainable food systems, an enhanced One Health approach and stronger food security outcomes
  • Prepare inputs for the June 2021 GASL MSP Meeting in Delémont, Switzerland, and for the 2021 Food Systems Summit
Regional objectives
  • Present regional impacts of COVID-19 and assess drivers of change, consequences and stakeholder responses to the challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic in the four sustainability domains of food and nutrition security, livelihoods and economic growth, animal health and animal welfare and climate and resource use.
  • Identify options in the short, medium and long run, on how the livestock sector is could improve its response through a sustainable livestock approach with solutions of multi-stakeholder nature.

GASL Regional Preparatory Meetings

2-3 September 2020 Africa 1 (English)

8, 9, 10 September 2020 Africa 2 (French)

WEBINAR: Food Systems Dashboard: A Decision-making Tool for Better Food Governance Decisions

17 September 2020. Food Systems Dashboard: A Decision-making Tool for Better Food Governance Decisions

This webinar demonstrated the easy-to-navigate Food Dashboard that helps decision makers and others around the world understand their food systems.

Recording and presentations forthcoming
  • Opening remarks: Martien Van Nieuwkoop, Global Director, Agriculture and Food Global Practice, The World Bank Group
  • Dr. Lawrence Haddad - Executive Director, Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN)
  • Jessica Fanzo, Ph.D.; Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Global Food & Agricultural Policy and Ethics, John Hopkins University
Discussants: 
  • Dr. Madhur Gautam, Lead Agriculture Economist, Agriculture and Food Global Practice, The World Bank Group
  • Dr. Geeta Sethi, Advisor and Global Lead for Food Systems, Agriculture and Food Global Practice, The World Bank Group

WEBINAR: 3rd virtual dialogue on Parliamentary action for resilient food systems in response to Covid-19

17 September 20203rd virtual dialogue on Parliamentary action for gender equality and resilient food systems in response to Covid-19. Protecting and promoting women’s land rights in the face of COVID19. Organized by FAO, IISD and Oxfam.

Recording of this webinar forthcoming

Land is a critical resource for rural women and men. Yet around the world, women remain significantly disadvantaged with regards to their right to land. Even when they are recognized as the primary users, they often lack ownership or control of the land or its economic outputs. The covid-19 pandemic threatens to exacerbate this inequality.

This dialogue discussed the importance of women’s land rights for the achievement of the SDG agenda in terms of the eradication of food insecurity, poverty and gender equality, as well as the measures that can be adopted to foster gender equitable land tenure rights during the Covid-19 pandemic and beyond. The dialogue’s objectives include: 
  • Raising awareness and strengthening knowledge on gender inequalities, land property rights, and the interlinkages with rural poverty and food insecurity. How can the SDG agenda and tools—such as the voluntary guidelines on the responsible governance of tenure of land, fisheries, and forestry—offer opportunities to strengthen women’s land rights?
  • Enhancing parliamentarians’ commitment to achieving SDG 2 on zero hunger and SDG 5 (particularly indicator 5.a.2) on gender equality through the promotion and adoption of gender-sensitive policy and legal frameworks
  • Promoting an exchange of knowledge and experiences among parliamentarians, women’s rights organizations, and other relevant stakeholders on specific measures and approaches to enhancing rural women’s land and property rights during and after the pandemic.
Speakers:
  • H.E. Josefa Leonel Correia Sacko, Commissioner for Rural Economy and Agriculture of the Africa Union Commission
  • His Majesty Mfumu Difima Ntinu, Traditional King of Congo, President of the Forum for African Traditional Authorities
  • Hon. Dr. Nyinawamwiza Laetitia, member of the Senate, Rwanda
  • Hon. Teddy Mwambire, Member of the National Assembly, Kenya
  • Hon. Gertrude Nduku Nguku, Vice Chairperson of the National Land Commission, Kenya
  • Ms. Martha Osorio, Gender and Rural Development Officer, FAO
  • Ms. Karol Boudreaux, Chief Program, Landesa
  • Ms. Esther Mwaura-Muiru, Founder of GROOTS Kenya and ILC Global Women Land Rights Manager
  • Ms. Neloum MBaigoto, Campaign Director for Chad without Hunger, Oxfam, Chad
  • Mr. Buawah Jobo Samba, Head of the National Land Policy and VGGT implementation secretariat in Sierra Leone

Moderation
  • Marcela Villareal, Director of the Division of Partnerships, FAO
  • Francine Picard, Policy Officer, IISD

WEBINAR: Mass Food Markets as Foundations of Knowledge, Resilience and African Memory

16 September 2020. WEBINAR: Mass Food Markets as Foundations of Knowledge, Resilience and African Memory.

It is not by coincidence that African mass food markets have remained open during the COVID19 era in most African countries. These markets are sources of income, food, knowledge and identity for the majority of Africans. They are centres of African memory and resilience.

Where formal systems use the notion of competitive advantage to hide knowledge, mass markets consider knowledge a common pool resource that is valuable in absorbing shocks and stimulating socio-economic development. Based on Charles Dhewa’s experiences working with mass food markets across Africa, this webinar will reveal how COVID19 is a wake-up call for African countries to invest in developing local knowledge systems.

Charles Dhewa is the Chief Executive Officer of Knowledge Transfer Africa (Pvt) Ltd (www.knowledgetransafrica.com / www.emkambo.co.zw ), based in Zimbabwe which he founded in 2006 to broker knowledge in agriculture and rural development.

ARTICLE: The 10 Elements of Agroecology

New FAO peer-reviewed publication “The 10 Elements of Agroecology - enabling transitions towards sustainable agriculture and food systems through visual narratives” has been just published. The paper is with open access. Find more information here.

The magnitude and urgency of the challenges facing agriculture and food systems demand profound modifications in different aspects of human activity to achieve real transformative change and sustainability. Recognizing that the inherent complexity of achieving sustainability is commonly seen as a deterrent to decision-making, FAO has approved the 10 Elements of Agroecology as an analytical framework to support the design of differentiated paths for agriculture and food systems transformation, hence facilitating improved decision-making by policymakers, practitioners and other stakeholders in differing contexts at a range of levels on a number of scales.

Biodiversity, consumers, education and governance are identified as promising entry points to build a structured process using visual narratives that rely on the 10 Elements of Agroecology to graphically dissect prospective social-ecological transition trajectories. The paper illustrates such applications with examples from agroforestry worldwide, public food procurement in Brazil and the United States of America, and agroecology education vis-à-vis secure access to land in Senegal. Nexus approaches are used to highlight and examine salient interactions among different sectors and entry points, and to develop visual narratives describing plausible theories of transformative change towards sustainable agriculture and food systems.

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

African farmer's leaders address COVID-19

16 September 2020. African farmer's leaders, presidents of #PAFO members networks, address COVID-19 by highlighting the several actions and responses provided in their respective regions and by proposing concrete solutions.

 

WEBINAR: The Nature of Nature: Why We Need the Wild

16 September 2020.
 The Nature of Nature: A Conversation organised by the World Resources Institute, with Enric Sala. 

Dr. Enric Sala, National Geographic explorer-in-residence, dives into topics of his new book The Nature of Nature: Why We Need the Wild. 

The conversation went beyond the pages to explore Enric’s passion for the wild, why now is the time for hope, the economic case for nature, and the way the novel coronavirus shifted our relationship with the world. 

The conversation was joined by the (new0 Minister of Environment of Ecuador: Andrea Meza.

Enric Sala wants to change the world--and in this compelling book, he shows us how. Once we appreciate how nature works, he asserts, we will understand why conservation is economically wise and essential to our survival.
  • Sala, director of National Geographic's Pristine Seas project (which has succeeded in protecting more than 5 million sq km of ocean), tells the story of his scientific awakening and his transition from academia to activism--as he puts it, he was tired of writing the obituary of the ocean. 
  • His revelations are surprising, sometimes counterintuitive: More sharks signal a healthier ocean; crop diversity, not intensive monoculture farming, is the key to feeding the planet.
  • Using fascinating examples from his expeditions and those of other scientists, Sala shows the economic wisdom of making room for nature, even as the population becomes more urbanized. 
  • In a sober epilogue, he shows how saving nature can save us all, by reversing conditions that led to the coronavirus pandemic and preventing other global catastrophes. 
  • With a foreword from Prince Charles and an introduction from E. O. Wilson, this powerful book will change the way you think about our world--and our future.

WEBINAR: Enhancing Commercialization of Africa’s Agricultural Research Products- Rice and Wheat Value Chains

16 September 2020TAAT CDTO Webinar Enhancing Commercialization of Africa’s Agricultural Research Products- Rice and Wheat Value Chains

WEBINAR: Stakeholder consultation on the development of a Farmer Field Schools E-Learning course

16 September 2020.  Stakeholder consultation on the development of a Farmer Field Schools E-Learning course

Sustainability is the only way forward. It must be reached through the development of capacities, and the transfer of skills and competencies. FAO elearning Academy offers a number of online learning and experience sharing solutions, to transfer skills and competencies. Today, the global farmer field school platform team is working hand in hand with the elearning academy to produce an e-learning course for project formulators, field staff and FFS specialists, to support the understanding and formulation of quality FFS programmes.

 

This webinar presented the general outline of the upcoming FFSe-learning course and open a discussion with participants.