Platform for African – European Partnership in Agricultural Research for Development

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Feeding The Soil or Feeding The Cow

Published on 28 Aug 2013
A documentary about Conservation Agriculture in Africa. Where and how can it work? Conservation Agriculture (CA) as an approach to managing agro-ecosystems helps improve and sustain land productivity, increase profits and food security while preserving and enhancing the resource base and the environment. This documentary focuses on the situation in Kenya, Tanzania and Burkina Faso.

Produced by Greendocs ( Made by Melchert Meijer zu Schlochtern and Simone de Hek. Commissioned by The African Conservation Tillage Network (ACT).


The African Conservation Tillage Network (ACTN) is a registered as a pan-African not-for-profit membership association that was initially commissioned with geographical focus on Southern, Central and East Africa. However, the Network has expanded responding to active interest from rest of the continent to west and North Africa.

Existing potential for synergistic collaborations and knowledge sharing, enriched by the diversity, across the continent has justified ACTN reformation into a pan-African establishment with networking value within and between regions. Membership to the Network is voluntary bringing together stakeholders and players who are:

  •  Dedicated to improving agricultural productivity through sustainable management of natural resources in African farming systems. 
  • Committed to the principles of mutual collaboration, partnerships and sharing of information and knowledge on sustainable natural resource management and drawing on synergies and complementarities. 
ACTN is established at three regional levels that include

  1. Southern-Central Africa Region; 
  2. East and Horn Africa Region; 
  3. West-North Africa Region. This enables each region to articulate its main uniqueness, thrust and strengths as basis for inter-regional sharing and interaction. A distinct North Africa region is foreseen in the future.

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